• Thursday, January 17, 2019

Bucherondin from Loire Valley

Roasted Tomato and Basil Frittata
By , Food Writer
December 22, 2018

We love hitting buzzy brunch spots, but nothing says Sunday morning like a warm, homemade frittata. Roasting cherry tomatoes and basil opens up their flavors and infuses the olive oil and the chèvre. Bûcherondin is a semi-aged chèvre that’s native to the Loire Valley, and it has a bloomy, edible rind that adds complexity and nutty undertones to the sweet tomatoes.

The chèvre on top of the frittata bubbles as it bakes (but retains a semi-firm texture), and the slices on top ensure that every piece will have an indulgent bite. It’s a simple recipe that delivers inviting French countryside flavors—and it’s perfect if you have guests.

Roasted Tomato and Basil Frittata

Ingredients

1 pint grape or cherry tomatoes

1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for greasing the pan

¼ tsp. fine sea salt, plus more to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

¼ cup packed fresh basil leaves (about 12 leaves), cut into thin ribbons

8 large eggs

2 oz Bucherondin, cut into 4 slices

Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400ºF.
  2. Place the tomatoes on a baking sheet, drizzle with the olive oil, season with pinches of salt and pepper, and toss to coat evenly. Roast for about 20 min until the tomatoes are softened and blistered, and some are starting to pop.
  3. Reduce the oven temperature to 350ºF. Grease a ceramic 8” baking dish or cast iron skillet with olive oil. Set aside.
  4. Break the eggs into a large bowl. Season with ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper and whisk to combine. Add the roasted tomatoes and basil, and stir to combine.
  5. Pour the mixture into the prepared baking dish and top with the Bucherondin slices. Cover with foil and bake for 20 minutes. Then uncover, and continue baking for about 20 more minutes until the center of the frittata is no longer giggly. Serve hot, warm, or at room temperature.

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